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Present Past is a dynamic approach to a rephotographic survey.

The City of Toronto has gone through many changes over the years. Certain buildings have stood the test of time and are dwarfed by the towers that surround them. Others have disappeared altogether. This series includes both to show the ever-changing face of the City of Toronto.

Union Station 1917

Southeast corner of Front St & York St     1917 vs 2018

Umbrella Edition - Signed and numbered series of 25.

The current Union Station is the 4th version of Union Station. The previous stations were located west between York & Simcoe Streets. 

see full description & specifications

Southeast corner of Front St & York St     1917 vs 2018

The current Union Station is the 4th version of Union Station. The previous stations were located west between York & Simcoe Streets.

The Great Toronto Fire of 1904 razed the buildings located between York & Bay Streets. The resulting vacant lot allowed for the relocation of Union Station. In 1905 it was decided but construction only began in 1915 due to conflict between the railways and city.

Delays occured due to a shortage of workers, materials and financing caused by World War I. By 1920 the headhouse and both office wings were complete. Disagreements between railway and city over approach tracks added seven years.

Completion was unfortunately timed with the Great Depression in 1930. Union Station was underused until World War II when wartime traffic surged through the station.

It is designated as a National Historic Site, owned by the City of Toronto.

City of Toronto Archives, Series 393; John Boyd Sr photographs, Item 14352

Umbrella Edition - Signed and numbered series of 25.

Customization available. Please inquire via email.

Vintage images from the Toronto Archives are merged with modern day images. White halos denote open sky where new structures overtake the skyline. Torn edges represent the split revealing a part of the past in our present.

The start of a series that will explore the vibrant neighborhoods around the city.

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